21

May

2015

Computer Based Training

Author: Matt Hallas

ENVI, IDL and ENVI LiDAR

I want to tell you about the newest ENVI, IDL and ENVI LiDAR training offering, computer based training(CBT). This online offering can help teach you new skills as well as review processing steps at your own speed right from your home or office. Not everyone has the time to leave their office for several days and attend training, but everyone needs to continue their education. Not everyone has the money to pay for expensive training courses that are not always specifically tailored to your workflow. With computer based training you can work at your own speed, for no additional cost, and find the right training module for your workflow.

Our computer based training modules will range from a wide variety of topics and difficulty levels, ensuring that you can become an ENVI and IDL expert if you put in the time. These training modules will be short and consumable, allowing you to run and understand complex workflows such as rare target detection and identification, but some modules will also focus on basic instruction regarding how to load in a wide array of data types into ENVI. You can also stop in the middle of a training and start back at the same point, flexibility helps to make online training so successful. As long as you have a website login then you will be able to access the trainings.

The page will be live starting next week so make sure to check back on our site periodically to see what new CBT's we have available.

The way this works is you go to the Training page found on the Learn tab of the Exelis website. Once here you select the computer based training tab and you will see the current CBT offerings. We will be continually adding more modules throughout the year. After choosing the module it will automatically start with a narration detailing what this specific module will focus on, you can also read the text describing that module including prerequisites and learning objectives.  There will be a seekbar and a play/pause button at the bottom of the CBT where you can pause the current interaction. If you want to know how to navigate through the modules then simply hit the tab titled ‘Training Module Navigation Guide’ and a guided tutorial will detail how to move through the CBT's. You will have the ability to download the data used in the CBT so that you can follow along on your personal machine in an effort to interactively work with the software.

Within each module you can find a glossary of commonly used terms, detailed background information on the topic at hand, and step-by-step instructions on how to complete the training in ENVI/IDL/ENVI LiDAR. The screenshots and narrations will help to act the part of your over the shoulder trainer. Some people like to have a visual representation of what they are learning to accompany this narration and that is why you will also see instructions in the Resources tab found at the top-right of all CBT modules.

It is suggested if you are starting at an entry level with any of our applications that you begin with the Mastering the Basics training modules, they will allow you to get on your feet quickly to then move into more complex processing and analysis. If you have suggestions for CBT topics that use ENVI, IDL or ENVI LiDAR then please send me an email - Matt.Hallas@exelisinc.com.

Comments (0) Number of views (384) Article rating: No rating

19

May

2015

Work on Landsat 9 Has Begun

Author: Peg Shippert

Close on the heels of a recent report by the Landsat Advisory Group concluding that the Landsat program has been wildly successful from the perspective of cost versus benefit, NASA recently announced that it and the US Geological Survey have begun work on the next Landsat platform, Landsat 9. Landsat 9 is expected to launch in 2023, and will carry two instruments: a visible through short wave infrared instrument, and a thermal instrument.

Jeffrey Masek, Landsat 9 Project Scientist at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center observed, "We have recognized for the first time that we’re not just going to do one more, then stop, but that Landsat is actually a long-term monitoring activity, like the weather satellites, that should go on in perpetuity." This is excellent news for those of us with interests in observations of phenomena on the Earth's surface over time!

Landsat 5 TM image collected November 7, 1984 of Atchafalaya Bay at the mouths of the Wax Lake Outlet and the Atchafalaya River in the Mississippi delta plain. Image courtesy of NASA.

Landsat 8 OLI image collected October 25, 2014 of the same area, illustrating the growth of deltas in this area. Image courtesy of NASA. Image courtesy of NASA.

 

Comments (0) Number of views (212) Article rating: No rating

Categories: ENVI Blog | Imagery Speaks

Tags:

14

May

2015

AUVSI "Making the Most of Big Data" Panel

Author: Matthew Bower

Last week I was fortunate to participate in the “Making the Most of Big Data” Panel, at the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI) Conference at the World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia. The panel consisted of industry experts on the technical execution, scientific, legal, and policy aspects of Geospatial Big Data, and was held before an audience of approximately 120 attendees.

I was able to speak about the future of Geospatial Big Data, including forward looking technological and cultural considerations. One topic of interest  to the audience was the “Passive Analytics” concept under research by Exelis VIS, and it’s applications to geospatial big data. The concept behind Passive Analytics is the idea that often times, geospatial data is collected with a specific purpose in mind, and that this purpose is reflected in the “telemetry” or “metadata” associated with the collect. By carefully examining the details and trends present in this metadata, it is possible to determine (to some reasonable degree of accuracy) the ways in which a user may want to exploit that data. 

For instance, consider a UAS platform carrying an FMV sensor and orbiting an areaof interest. The fact that the platform has performed an orbit, and kept the sensor steady on a specific area throughout the orbit, can be detected within the metadata. This can serve to identify to a system that this area is important, and queue the system to take some action, such as computing a 3D model from the source FMV. This 3D model may be a more effective product for exploitation by the end user.   

The monitoring of the incoming data, and the execution of processing when entry criteria are met, can be handled by the big data processing center without user input (passively, thus Passive Analytics). The result is a refined or enhanced product, available on-demand when the user searches the big data system.  The Passive Analytics frameworks, and related products, such as ENVI Services Engine (ESE), and Jagwire, are just some of the technologies Exelis VIS brings to the evolving world of geospatial big data.  

Speaking at the panel was a great experience; it’s exciting to see the new realm of possibilities opening up as Geospatial Big Data makes its way to the forefront of the Geospatial and Analytics communities.  My sincere thanks go to my fellow panelists, and the great team at AUVSI for the wonderful experience. I look forward to participating again next year, and seeing just how far Geospatial Big Data has grown.

 

Comments (0) Number of views (340) Article rating: No rating

Categories: ENVI Blog | Imagery Speaks

Tags:

12

May

2015

Looking to Students to Foster Innovative Analytics

Author: Joey Griebel


One of the most rewarding parts of working in the Academic space is seeing the raw passion students have for Analytics and the off the wall uses they come up with while using them. In Academia, there are not the borders on creativity, or deadlines on projects due to a customer, that prevent the limits from being pushed.

Last year, I had the pleasure of talking with a student from the University of Colorado who had used some of the freely available LiDAR data provide by FEMA in 2013 for the Boulder floods, in conjunction with ENVI LiDAR, to develop a Level within Minecraft. This is the perfect example of how the tools we use day to day to provide information to a customer, or someone fighting on the frontline, can be pushed and used in a way most would never think of.

This creativity and innovation in Academics is not going unnoticed. I was excited to see that NGA and USGS see the same potential coming from Academia and opened applications to become an Academic Center of Excellence for Universities. The Academic Center of Excellence will help develop state of the art geospatial sciences technologies and tradecraft.

Another great example is the Student Incentive Program we are excited to be taking part in with PrecisonHawk. Students will have the opportunity to develop new and useful Algorithm’s for Remote Sensing, using ENVI+IDL. Then, depending on relevance and usefulness, have their algorithms hosted to PrecisionHawk’s Datamapper. Not only will Students get the chance to get recognition from an exciting new UAS Company and have something to set them apart on their resume, but there is potential to earn money as well. I see Academia continuing to grow as test and development bed for cutting edge technology in the remote sensing industry. Without the constrictions of a work deadlines and the right guidance, students can truly change the future of analytics and what tools are capable of uncovering from data.

Comments (0) Number of views (332) Article rating: 4.0

Categories: ENVI Blog | Imagery Speaks

Tags:

7

May

2015

Use ENVI and DigitalGlobe Data to Help Recovery Efforts in Nepal

Author: Joe Peters

This past week, Exelis and DigitalGlobe, Inc. agreed to provide a new commercial offering of cloud-based ENVI analytics for the DigitalGlobe Geospatial Big Data Platform (GBD). The agreement will enable imagery users to easily combine powerful geospatial analytics with the vast DigitalGlobe image library to solve challenging environmental, natural resource and global security problems.

In response to the devastating 7.8 magnitude earthquake that struck central Nepal on April 25, DigitalGlobe has made high resolution satellite imagery of the affected areas freely available online to all groups involved in the response and recovery effort. This imagery can be accessed via http://services.digitalglobe.com. For more information on how to access DigitalGlobe high resolution imagery to aid in recovery efforts, see this blog post.

In addition to the offerings that DigitalGlobe has made available, DigitalGlobe and Exelis have put their new partnership to good use by setting up Amazon instances allowing free access to the data and ENVI image analysis software for anyone that would like to lend their image analysis skills to generate useful products for response and recovery efforts. If you are interested in getting access to one of these Amazon instances, please contact the DigitalGlobe GBD team via http://geobigdata.launchrock.com. You can also contact us at info@exelisvis.com.

Comments (0) Number of views (604) Article rating: 5.0

Categories: ENVI Blog | Imagery Speaks

Tags:

12345678910 Last

MOST POPULAR POSTS

AUTHORS

Authors

Authors

Authors

Authors

Authors

Authors

Authors

GUEST AUTHORS

Authors

Authors

Authors

© 2015 Exelis Visual Information Solutions